In Grammar By Victoria

Interrogative pronouns in the English language

Another group of pronouns in English are interrogative pronouns (interrogative pronouns). They are also a bit like pointing. For the interrogative pronoun in the English language are the following words: who (who), what (that which, as well as the value of the «who» when we talk about the profession or position a person), whose (whose), which (who). Question pronoun in the English language we need for special education issues. Each of these has its own nuances pronouns use, so analyze them in order.


How to use the interrogative pronoun in the English language?

The first in line pronoun who. This pronoun is used against individuals. This pronoun, there are two case forms: nominative — just who, objective case whom. The form of the pronoun in the objective case is rarely used, mainly in the official book, and styles of speech. In colloquial speech, use the who. What functions in a bid to comply with this interrogative pronoun in the English language? It may be:

  • Subject. Note that in this case the verb-predicate, who will be accompanying in the form of the third person singular.

    Who knows the answer to this question? — Who knows the answer to this question?

    Who broke the window? — Who broke the window?

  • Nominal part of the predicate. Now we’ll align the verb in person and number with the subject.

    Who are those strange women? — Who are those strange women?

    Who is your husband? — Who is your husband?

  • Direct and indirect prepositional complement. Note that the preposition that accompanies these interrogative pronouns in English is usually put at the end of sentences.

    Who (whom) did you invite to the party? — Who do you invite to the party?

    Who (whom) did you show this book to? — Who showed you this book?

    Who (whom) are you waiting for here? — Who are you waiting for?

    Who (whom) are you going to spend the holidays with? — With whom you spend the holidays?

Next, let’s talk about the interrogative pronoun what. This pronoun is used to refer to inanimate objects. Its function in the same sentence, such as who pronouns. That is, in a sentence what the pronoun in the sentence can be:

  • Subject. The verb-predicate in this case is also used in the form of the third person singular.

    What was written in this article? — What was written in this article?

    What is it? — What is it?

  • Nominal part of the predicate. The verb-copula agrees in person and number with the subject.

    What is the cost of this yellow bag? — How much is this yellow bag?

    What are the results of this competition? — What are the results of the competition?

  • The direct and indirect prepositional complement. The pretext related to this interrogative pronouns are usually always at the end.

    What did you choose? — What did you choose?

    What have you lost? — What have you lost?

    What were you talking about? — What were you talking about?

Interrogative pronouns what can be used against individuals if we are to learn a profession or employment rights. For example:

What is he? — Who is he? He is a builder. He is a builder.

However, this caveat does not apply to questions aimed at finding out the name, surname, family relations. In this case, we use the pronoun who.

This interrogative pronoun in the English language as whose, in a bid to play a function definition and is defined before they noun.

Whose document have you brought? — Whose document you brought?

Whose bag is it? — Whose bag is this?

Interrogative pronouns which can be applied to both animate and inanimate objects. It implies a choice of a limited number of persons or things:

Which dish did you like? — What dish did you like? (there were several)

Which language would you like to learn? — Which language would you like to study? (for example, a variety of courses including languages ​​5-6)

Which of you will participate in this ceremony? — How many of you will participate in the ceremony? (And you are only 10)

And do not forget about set phrases:

  • what kind of? — What, what kind of:

    What kind of literature do you prefer? — What kind of books do you prefer?

  • what about …? — How about that …?

    What about going out tonight? — How about we go somewhere today?

  • what if …? — What if …?

    What if she does not believe us? — What if she does not believe us?

This topic is closely related to the other as described in the articles that need to pay attention:

  • «Demonstrative pronouns in the English language»
  • «The relative pronoun in the English language»

After reading them, we recommend to pass the following test: «Test # 2 on the use of pronouns in the English language.»

 

Grammar

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